How To Pronounce the Word “Tinnitus”

There seems to be some confusion as to the accurate pronunciation of the word “tinnitus.” Some people pronounce it “ti-nahy-tuhs,” while others choose to say “ti-nə-təs.” In fact, both pronunciations are equally accurate and it just comes down to personal preference.

EarI tend to prefer to say “ti-nə-təs,” as this pronunciation and its roots seem to be a more accurate description of this symptom. The word “tin” in Latin means “to ring” and “itus” means inflammation. But the mechanism behind the phantom sounds often resulting in a high pitched ringing, does not appear to be related to any sort of inflammation.

Therefore, I personally choose to pronounce the word “ti-nə-təs” to more accurately reflect what we believe the etiology to be. But really the choice is yours.

Tinnitus and the Ears

The question often arises: “Doesn’t the ringing associated with tinnitus come from the ears?” Ask anyone with tinnitus and they can tell you how the sensation feels more like it is coming from somewhere in their head. When tinnitus is “unilateral” it means it is heard in one ear. “Bilateral” means it is heard in both ears. And this is, in fact, true. We know now that tinnitus is actually a problem not in the ears but in the brain. Although most cases of tinnitus come with some amount of hearing loss, it is the brain’s mis-interpretation of the signal that results in the ringing, chirping, whooshing, crackling noises we call tinnitus.

Breathing Exercises for Tinnitus

Most people with tinnitus notice that stress is a trigger for the worsening of tinnitus. This is why most management tools for relieving tinnitus include some form of relaxation as a way to lessen and prevent the discomfort. Although we are not certain, this may be the reason why acupuncture, deep breathing, exercise, a change in diet, getting more sleep, and certain medications have been helpful for some in reducing tension and stress and, in turn, relieving some tinnitus bother. 

What is great about using breathing exercises as a way to relieve tension is that breathing is free, it goes with you everywhere, and you don’t need a prescription!  Here is a deep breathing exercise to help manage the stress that is part of living:

images-4Whenever and wherever you need it—morning, noon, and night—simply push back from whatever you are doing and close your eyes (if that feels comfortable to you). Sitting or standing comfortably in a way that does not obstruct your breathing, placing your awareness on the sensation of this breath; breathing in through the nose and out through your nose. Allowing each breath to fill your chest and belly. Continue the gentle, even flow of each wave of breath for ten deep belly breaths. At the end of ten deep breaths, notice if you feel a release of tension. If the tension remains, continue with ten more deep belly breaths. When you are ready, open your eyes knowing that the breath is always there to help you find balance—no matter where you are and no matter what life throws your way.